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Nintendo's next major game is about to launch — here's everything we know about 'Splatoon 2'

Nintendo is bringing "Splatoon" to its wildly successful Nintendo Switch console.

Splatoon originally debuted as a Nintendo's Wii U game and while the Wii U console was a flop, it was a flop with a bunch of killer games. Stuff like "Super Mario Maker" and "Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze" were underappreciated gems, handicapped by the console they were exclusive to — the Wii U.

And then there's "Splatoon," an excellent new series first introduced on the Wii U back in 2015.

"Splatoon 2" will arrive in less than two weeks — it's planned for launch on July 21 — but we already know a ton about the upcoming sequel. 

A kid-friendly third-person shooter

'Isolated and friendless': Australian journalist eviscerates Trump in viral news segment

An Australian journalist gave a scathing critique of President Donald Trump's performance at the G-20 summit in Germany this week in a news segment that has gone viral in the United States.

In the news segment, aired on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation show "Insiders," Chris Uhlmann described Trump as an "isolated and friendless" leader on the global stage who "has no desire and no capacity to lead the world."

"He was an uneasy, lonely, awkward figure at this gathering, and you got the strong sense that some of the leaders are trying to find the best way to work around him,” Uhlmann said, speaking from the conference in Hamburg.

Uhlmann said Trump wasted an opportunity to condemn North Korea for its recent test of long-range missiles, a move that could have earned him support from other leaders turned off by his opposition to the Paris Agreement on climate change.


7 startups that were massively funded that died in 2017

Where there's life, there's death, and Silicon Valley is no different. 

For every billion dollar unicorn, there are endless numbers of start-ups that have passed into the ether — laying off their engineers in matching, branded t-shirts; closing down their game rooms filled with ping-pong tables; and leaving heartfelt goodbye notes for customers on their soon-to-be defunct websites.

We're halfway through 2017 and already a group of startups that together raised $1.48 billion have shut down. 

From February's shuttering of Beepi, a used car exchange once valued at $560 million, to this week's closure of gadget maker Jawbone, which was once worth $3 billion, these are the start ups we've lost so far in 2017 — and one whose demise looks imminent. May they disrupt in peace. 

Beepi: 2013 — February 2017

Tesla's massive batteries could power 50,000 homes in Australia — here are 15 other ways they're already being used (TSLA)

Tesla is preparing to launch its biggest battery project yet.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk said Friday in Australia that it will use its giant battery, the Powerpack, to build a 100 MW battery system in South Australia. When it's completed, it will be the biggest battery storage project in the world.

The batteries will store energy generated by a wind farm in Jamestown, South Australia. The battery system could be large enough to power 50,000 homes.

Since acquiring SolarCity in November, Tesla has been doubling down on its renewable energy efforts.


'Do you want to see the car?': The story of the day that Tesla stunned the world (TSLA, F)

In early 2016, Ford was intensely preparing to stage a history-repeating assault on the 24 Hours of Le Mans in France.

With two teams and four new Ford GT race cars competing in both North America and Europe, the goal was to grab a win at the grueling endurance competition and remind the world of Ford's 1-2-3 triumph in 1966 over Ferrari — 50 years before.

But while Ford and Chip Ganassi Racing were battling it out on the track, another challenge was taking shape.

In California, Tesla CEO Elon Musk was preparing to pull the cover off his long-awaited Model 3 mass-market vehicle — a car intended to show the auto industry that Tesla was ready to take its disruption to a whole new level.

In this excerpt from Business Insider Senior Correspondent Matthew DeBord's book "


'Do you want to see the car?': The story of the day that Tesla stunned the world (TSLA, F)

In early 2016, Ford was intensely preparing to stage a history-repeating assault on the 24 Hours of Le Mans in France.

With two teams and four new Ford GT race cars competing in both North America and Europe, the goal was to grab a win at the grueling endurance competition and remind the world of Ford's 1-2-3 triumph in 1966 over Ferrari — 50 years before.

But while Ford and Chip Ganassi Racing were battling it out on the track, another challenge was taking shape.

In California, Tesla CEO Elon Musk was preparing to pull the cover off his long-awaited Model 3 mass-market vehicle — a car intended to show the auto industry that Tesla was ready to take its disruption to a whole new level.

In this excerpt from Business Insider Senior Correspondent Matthew DeBord's book "


Microsoft loses a top exec, a day after announcing massive layoffs (MSFT)

Microsoft's chief information officer, Jim DuBois, has left the company, reports GeekWire.

DuBois had been with Microsoft since 1993, and was named its CIO in 2013. In that role, DuBois oversaw Microsoft's internal IT organization.

Earlier this week, Microsoft announced a massive reorganization of its sales efforts to focus on cloud computing. On Thursday, Microsoft announced that these changes would result in thousands of layoffs. It's unclear if DuBois' departure was linked to these changes.


Tesla's stock has soared but its vehicle output is still just a blip (TSLA)

Investors bet big on Tesla this year, helping its market cap reach $51 billion and briefly beat out General Motors, Ford, and Fiat Chrysler (aka "the big three") to claim the title of most valuable car manufacture. But vehicle delivery numbers shown in this chart from Statista show that Tesla's actual vehicle production is far below its competitors. Even CEO Elon Musk has questioned the high valuation, telling the Guardian "I do believe this market cap is higher than we have any right to deserve." 

Tesla has only produced 47,100 cars so far in 2017. Many investors are betting on the future of electric cars and Elon Musk's vision rather than Tesla's actual car making abilities. The mass market Model 3 is due out 


Volvo's all-out assault on Tesla's turf is as much about its future as its past (TSLA)

Volvo Cars says its entire lineup will either become electric or hybridized by 2019.

For cynics, Volvo's announcement is a mere PR stunt designed to capitalize on the propulsion method du jour. After all, Tesla, a company that sells less than 80,000 electric cars a year now boasts a market cap on par with General Motors.

On the other hand, proponents of electric mobility applaud Volvo for being a mainstream automaker brave enough to take the plunge. 

While I am neither cynic nor e-mobility evangelist, I think Volvo's decision to go electric makes perfect sense.                      

Of all of the world's mainstream automakers, Volvo's all-out assault on electric mobility is the least surprising. And it has much to do with the future as it has with the past.


A diabetes medication that costs 6 cents a pill could be a key to living longer

A generic drug that's used to treat type 2 diabetes could help people live longer, healthier lives. 

Metformin, a drug that's been approved in the US for decades, is typically taken as a pill every day by people with diabetes. 

But now researchers are looking into whether the drug could hold the key to living longer — and early research seems promising.

Dr. Nir Barzilai, the director of Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, has been researching the drug, with the hopes of one day getting it approved as an anti-aging treatment by the FDA.

If future research yields good results, metformin could become a much cheaper option than other approaches


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